h1

Repost: Marlin Perkins – The Cat’s Meow

May 23, 2014
perkins

Not the cover. I have no idea what the cover looked like.

A two-sided 7″ 33 1/3 RPM single put out by Norden Labs to promote a feline distemper vaccine, featuring TV’s Marlin Perkins.
Marlin, as you all know, was host of the long-running television program Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom from the 60’s and well into the 70’s
Here Marlin waxes scientifically about the existence of the Abominable Snowman and somehow – on side two – manages to relate it to the vaccine Felocine.

Side One:

Side Two: 

Download. (updated 5/24/14)

h1

Repost: Crazy Found Record: Don and John Lampien

May 23, 2014

I Won’t Say I Love You/BW The Sheik of Araby

Low budget looking 7 inch 45 rpm I found in a christian thrift store.
I couldn’t pass it up; it had all the marks of a homemade record or at the very least a vanity recording of the type where some truck driver scraped up enough money to cut a record. Plus, it was from nearby Seaside Oregon, so my curiosity was doubly piqued.

How can I describe these recordings? On the a-side, one of the Lampien brothers (I’m assuming) croons a heartfelt love song while someone does a fair Helen Wiggins of The Shaggs impersonation, barely keeping time and switching the accent from snare to high-hat mid-song.

A-Side: I Won’t Say I Love You

On the flip, we have a swinging country song that incorporates the old standard The Sheik of Araby and while the drumming Lampien manages to keep time well enough this time around (I’m guessing the boys learned how studio playback worked by this point), the song incorporates a Donald Duck-like voice as counterpoint to the singing.

B-Side: The Sheik of Araby

Crazy!

I immediately rushed back to the store and bought every copy they had.

Download

h1

Repost: Sears, Inc.: Demonstration Disc Sears #9235

May 23, 2014

A favorite weird found seven inch I’ve had for years.

It’s a one-sided, 33 1/3 RPM that apparently was a training aid for stereo salespeople.

There’s somewhat of an attempt at production value and it’s plenty humorous, with a sort of Gary Owens-like announcer/narrator and a cute female voice that responds to everything with a coo or interjection like ‘groovy‘ or ‘dynamite‘.

The narrative runs us through the various features of the 9235 (whatever that was) with music and the sounds of adjustments being made.

The opening narrator refers to the recording as ‘a tape’, so this may have also been on cassette, open reel or 8-track tape and the inclusion on 7 inch may have been an afterthought.

It was plenty hammered by the time I found it – without a cover in the bottom of some 50 cent bin at a thrift store. I made no attempts to clean it up or compress it. I exported it at 320kbps, so have at it. It could probably use some de-clicking and some de-essing, especially on the girl’s parts. But there’s plenty of cool dialog and one-liners for you DJs looking for cool retro soundbites. As far as I know, this isn’t anywhere on the web.

I’ve played this many times on my radio shows. I really like it.

Play:

Download (re-up’d 05/22/14)
I included also one isolated sample in the zipfile because it’s both handy and I like it.

h1

The Monitors: Silly Sci-Fi From Second City c. 1969

May 23, 2014

This oddball sci-fi satire used to pop up on late-night TV fairly frequently when I was a kid.

It’s based on a Keith Laumer novel of the same name (which I’ve never read) and deals with a group of benevolent bowler-wearing aliens who have conquered earth and imposed peace all over the world. They’ve also outlawed most earthling passions – you know – hate, greed, war, real love, etc. That doesn’t sit well with a growing rebel faction, which is where we come in.

It was a creation of Chicago’s legendary Second City troupe and was directed by Jack Shea, and was a joint effort of Second City and the Bell-Howell corporation. Many Second City alumni appear (Avery Schreiber, for one, at the same time that he was doing Frito commercials), as well as some actors who weren’t in it (Guy Stockwell, Susan Oliver, Ed Begley Sr., Alan, Adam and Matthew Arkin, Keenan Wynn and F-Troop’s Larry Storch) , some strange cameos by the likes of Xavier Cugat, Jackie Vernon and Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen, playing himself in one of the numerous hilarious TV PSA segments. The cinematographer was future Oscar winner Vilmos Zsigmond.

There’s also songs by Odetta and loads and loads of quotable dialog and interesting soundbites.

This offering isn’t the movie’s soundtrack – I don’t think it’s ever been released. I simply recorded the audio when it was briefly available for streaming on that movie streaming service we love and loathe. I made it into a CD-length album, of sorts, mainly consisting of the theme, interesting dialog, those aforementioned PSA segments and more.

I hope you enjoy it!

The Monitors Are Your Friends.

h1

Sketch Erickson ‎– Sketch Sounds Off On Trends In Today’s ‘Pop’ Culture

May 12, 2014

FourMost Productions ‎– FM-6919CS – 196?

“Sketch Erickson finds himself a target on the taut, thin line between two generations. His programs, which examine trends in our so-called “pop culture”, pull no punches with either group. 
Sketch is a leading advertising artist who left that career to conduct his crusade for decency among teens. He’s the father of four children, three of whom are teens. As and artist he studied in Europe and Chicago and served as an art director for several leading publishers. He is also a musician who has directed both instrumental and choral groups.”

I’ve got tons of religious records. I’ve also got tons of spoken word religious records – so many, in fact, that I’ve had to break them into sections to separate the end-of-the-world prophecy LPs from the ‘what will happen when the godless commie liberals take over’ LPs from the ‘pastors talking to teens about sex, drugs and rock and roll’ LPs.
This one, from what I am guessing is the late 60s is one of the latter. I’ve got lots of these ones, too. There was something about the track listing on the back that drew me in. Sketch is more of the school of the ‘hep’ and ‘with it’ pastor who can ‘groove’ with today’s young generation. He doesn’t come across as openly judgemental about music, movies and pop trends but he is.

The main selling point for those of us with the constitution to listen to this hellfire and brimstone crap is the goofy skits and sketches (no pun intended) that serve to illustrate Erickson’s points about the slippery slope towards Satan. There are some hilarious attempts at approximating groovy hippy music done by a souless Christian folk group, complete with some awful guitar freakouts. It’s pretty funny.

 

Let’s have church

h1

The Best of Kaleidoscope – Featuring the ’72 Allegras

May 11, 2014

I picked up this record on the same visit to the East Vancouver, WA Goodwill that I bought the previously posted accordion record.

And, like that record, I seldom buy these church produced band/choir LPs. I do check them out from time to time to see if there’s anything funny, weird or inappropriate for that kind of music. You know what I mean. A way-too grown-up song sung by children – ala Langley School Music Project, etc. – Or maybe something schmaltzy and maudlin. But I think most of those kinds of records have really square music directors, not even letting the poor kids do one single rock and or roll song. It’s the devil’s music, don’t you know.

This one appealed to me though, as it’s all contemporary song hits, via 1972 and shortly before. There’s some Bacharach and David, some Carpenters and even a Leonard Cohen song, for Christ’s sake!

It’s from a Catholic girl’s school from Portland Oregon. I did a little searching for the album and school and – lo and behold – see that friend and WFMU radio host Tony Coulter covered this on WFMU’s Beware of the Blog in two thousand and eleven. You can read about it here (in fact, I snatched the scans from there, as I am presently unable to take acceptable LP photos at the moment).

It’s a fun album. Not quite as charming and kooky as the aforementioned Langly School album, but still lots of fun. There’s some tremulous but spirited solo performances and some fun but somewhat stiff multi-voiced takes on hit songs of the 70s. I don’t know where they got their drummer but he just goes apeshit in a few places. I like to imagine they borrowed some hot-stuff percussionist from the boy’s school and his hormones just went wild being around all the girls. His frantic drumming at the start of Put Your Hand In The Hand can’t be missed.

Come and get it.

h1

Shelly Taylor – Accordion Stylings of West Side Story

May 11, 2014

Image

I never would’ve looked at this record twice, normally. I am somewhat averse to accordion records and have this fear that if I buy one, I’ll soon have to start a whole partition for them in my collection. The thought of accordion versions of West Side Story seemed even more daft. Maybe it was the mood I was in. The back pictures and write up on the back sort of sold me on it.

Image

That’s not Shelly on the cover. No, boy. It’s this guy. (sorry for the crappy pics. I’m too lazy to do it properly)

It sounded kind of weird from the copy. It says Mr. Taylor used a stereophonic accordion through effects and that he had ‘high-frequency microphones’ on his fingertips to record the ‘maraca-like’ sounds of his fingers on the keys and buttons.

I ended up buying it. Goodwill makes it really hard to want to take a chance on records, since they sell shit records that aren’t worth 25 cents for a ludicrous $2.99 now – but I did it anyway.

It’s hoot, let me tell ya. It seems Taylor is really enamored of his vibrato unit. It sounds like he’s playing accordion underwater in over half the tracks and I’m not sure what’s going on with the crazy panning. I had to stop listening more than once to assure myself that there wasn’t something wrong with my setup, as the audio creeps from side to side often. I suspect someone was going apeshit during mixing. Or maybe it was Mr. Taylor’s live rig, as I found references to him being a big dinner theatre draw in the 60s, with the ad copy referencing his ‘stereophonic’ sound. One one particularly spirited track, he beats on his squeezebox like a pair of bongos.

Shelly Taylor was (is?) a great player, no doubt. Was he nuts? Probably.
The bulk of the album is dedicated to West Side Story (What? No Officer Krupke?) and then there’s a few maniacally played standards and a few original tunes for good measure.

Get it here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 564 other followers