Archive for the ‘spoken-word’ Category

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Estus W. Pirkle – If Footmen Tire You, What Will Horses Do?

February 6, 2016

pirkle iftywwhd front

MPLP – 2368 1968

The crown jewel of crazy spoken word Christian albums.

Why? I’ve got several dozens of records like this. So many, in fact, that they’ve grown to have their own section of my collection. I’m just about ready to split that section into a section of what’s going to happen when the communists take over records.

Why is this one so special? Never mind that it’s currently going for a pretty penny on record auction sites. It’s the reason it is that makes it so special. It’s not only record that spawned the equally batshit crazy Ron Ormand film of the same name (go Google it. We’ll wait.).  It’s also the record from which Negativland sampled from to create the classic track from their best-selling LP Escape From Noise, Christianity Is Stupid, immortalizing Rev. Pirkle forever. In it, Pirkle can be heard entoning ‘Christianity is stupid! Communism is good! Give up!’ over and over, backed by a martial industrial, metallic beat. It got a lot of airplay on college radio. Maybe it’s the first thing you heard by them. It’s probably the closest the band’s ever had to a hit record until the U2/Casey Kasem debacle. I know I put it on a lot of mix tapes for friends for many years in the 80s.

To be fair, the record itself takes a while to heat up. Pirkle is an energetic speaker. I imagine someone had to take him out with a dart gun to get him to stop a sermon. He just goes on non-stop like a trailer park meth-head. The first half of the LP is concerned with the Book of Jeremiah and attempts to connect modern, backslidden Christians with passages from that part of the bible before getting to what happens when the evil communists take over America. It’s not until side two that things really pick up, with Pirkle telling a lot of John Birch-type horror stories about some of the (possibly conflated) things that communists did to Christians when they took over various countries. It’s pretty unsettling – made all the more hysterical by Pirkle’s chatterbox delivery.
It isn’t until well into the last half of the second side that he gets into the passage so famously sampled in the Negativland track. And it’s easy to see why they – perhaps Don Joyce – found it so humorous and ripe for appropriation. Pirkle lists the litany of atrocities in the first person. It doesn’t take much work with a razor blade or audio editor to have him admitting to some pretty horrible war crimes. It’s pretty dang hilarious, actually.

Estus Pirkle put out a few more LPs and lived to around 2005. There’s no telling what he made of today’s radicalized religious climate. No doubt he would’ve been pretty much a fish out of water what with gay rights and today’s attitudes with reproductive rights and society’s total abandonment of scriptural living. I don’t know if he ever ventured into the multimedia world again. He probably lived long enough to see his forays into the film world met with scorn and ridicule (Ron Ormand also filmed his epic sermon The Burning Hell). I once made a half-assed attempt to secure copies of Footmen by writing his still-existing church, inquiring about copies (imagining a basement filled with of boxes of records) – but to no avail.

But now you can have it! Not mine, mind you, but you can now listen to it, in glorious 1968 mono. Some words on the rip. The audio quality is a bit less than stellar. Either the pressing or the master doesn’t sound that great. There’s some audible distortion that’s in the record. It’s not due to the condition – it appears virtually unplayed – but it the grooves have the glassine appearance of a record that’s been cut in such a way as to maximize the play time per side. I’ve tried to rip it in the best way possible but to my ears, it doesn’t sound so great. I don’t think it detracts from its nuttiness, though.

Here it is:
Give up

Boilerplate on rips and the sharing thereof:
As you may have noticed, I’ve been ripping some rare records from my own collection that – as far as I know – no one has posted elsewhere. They’re there for your entertainment. If you would like to host them on your own blog, download them yourself and upload them to the host of your choice – but please respect my hard work and accredit this blog..  I am more than willing to share them that way. If you’d like to host some of these files and reprint my reviews, kindly ask me.

 

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Dr. J.D. Carlson – How Can A Man Rise Above The Fear Of Death?

September 1, 2014

Praise Records, c. 196?

I know. A lot of my rips have been crazy Xtian sermon records lately. It’s just that I have so many of them and so many that I never see anyone post anywhere else.

Sorry.

This one’s really kooky, though. Dr. Carlson has a really silly delivery style, really stilted and with weird annunciation, like maybe he’s really Canadian or something. I especially like how he pronounces evil as EEE-vel.  He rambles from one tangent to the next, attempting some really dumb humor along the way – maybe in an attempt to inject a little levity in a somewhat depressing subject – death.  I’m willing to bet you never heard the words dyingdied and death more on one record in your life. 

I can’t find a lot of information on J.D. Carlson or this sermon. I think it’s really ripe for cut-up or audio collage. What do you think?

Dying, Died, Dead.

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Ira North – If I Were A Woman – Eden Records

August 25, 2014

Here’s a rip of a record the cover of which has been making the rounds the past year or so. It is a perennial favorite on all those ‘wacky record covers’ sites, due to the hilarious juxtaposition of the picture and the cluelessly out-of-touch title.

North is a pretty typical Deep South type preacher man, but he can get his captive audience rolling in the aisles with his homey, down-to-earth sense of humor.

The subject matter of this record, however, seems to be the total subordination of women, as per biblical doctrine. It’s pretty infuriating to listen to. Lots of craptacular sound-bites to be had for all you sample-heads.

Ironically enough, I found mine in a Salvation Army for a buck.

Enjoy!

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Y: RFK Assassination Record

June 9, 2014

Odd little piece of Robert F. Kennedy assassination memorabilia that was assembled and produced by Doug Moody of Mystic Studios – who many may recall as the producer of those wonderful and sometimes wretched Mystic punk rock compilations of the mid-80s.

It’s a collection of audio from around the time of RFK’s assassination. It includes interviews with eyewitnesses, from people who came to believe immediately following that tragic event that perhaps there was a conspiracy to take his life, some recollections from people that knew Sirhan Sirhan and also some audio verite from the actual assassination. Each portion of the LP either begins or ends with a key speech by Robert Kennedy – including his chillingly ironic violence in America speech.

Apparently, Doug or perhaps RFK conspiracy theorist filmmaker Theodor Carach tried to sell it to Zappa’s Straight label but it ended up not coming out. I found this quote somewhere but lost my notes from whence it came (probably from one of the more esoteric corners of communities of people who collect Zappa interviews):

“A man came to us with some tapes. He had been making a documentary album about the assassination of Robert Kennedy and he had interviewed all these people and he had put together this really fantastic album. That was when we had the Bizarre label and the deal with Warner Brothers on the bizarre label was we could bring projects to them and they had the right to refuse them and they heard that and that’s why it never came out. They were afraid of it.”

I don’t think the film from where this audio comes from ever came to fruition, so perhaps because of or in spite of that, Moody assembled it into an LP and it eventually came out on Solar Records, but I am unsure of the year. It has a more-or-less functional entry on Discogs. Given that the Warner/Bizarre/Straight deal only lasted from 1969 to 1973, I am guessing it came out somewhere within that (missed) window of opportunity – give or take a year or two. Someone on Collector Frenzy talks about having a copy signed by Ted Carach and dated ’74, so we know it was no later than that. Back and to the left. Back and to the left.

The cover is an interesting illustration made on a typewriter simply using the letter ‘y’. Clever, eh?

Download

 

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The Monitors: Silly Sci-Fi From Second City c. 1969

May 23, 2014

This oddball sci-fi satire used to pop up on late-night TV fairly frequently when I was a kid.

It’s based on a Keith Laumer novel of the same name (which I’ve never read) and deals with a group of benevolent bowler-wearing aliens who have conquered earth and imposed peace all over the world. They’ve also outlawed most earthling passions – you know – hate, greed, war, real love, etc. That doesn’t sit well with a growing rebel faction, which is where we come in.

It was a creation of Chicago’s legendary Second City troupe and was directed by Jack Shea, and was a joint effort of Second City and the Bell-Howell corporation. Many Second City alumni appear (Avery Schreiber, for one, at the same time that he was doing Frito commercials), as well as some actors who weren’t in it (Guy Stockwell, Susan Oliver, Ed Begley Sr., Alan, Adam and Matthew Arkin, Keenan Wynn and F-Troop’s Larry Storch) , some strange cameos by the likes of Xavier Cugat, Jackie Vernon and Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen, playing himself in one of the numerous hilarious TV PSA segments. The cinematographer was future Oscar winner Vilmos Zsigmond.

There’s also songs by Odetta and loads and loads of quotable dialog and interesting soundbites.

This offering isn’t the movie’s soundtrack – I don’t think it’s ever been released. I simply recorded the audio when it was briefly available for streaming on that movie streaming service we love and loathe. I made it into a CD-length album, of sorts, mainly consisting of the theme, interesting dialog, those aforementioned PSA segments and more.

I hope you enjoy it!

The Monitors Are Your Friends.

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Sketch Erickson ‎– Sketch Sounds Off On Trends In Today’s ‘Pop’ Culture

May 12, 2014

FourMost Productions ‎– FM-6919CS – 196?

“Sketch Erickson finds himself a target on the taut, thin line between two generations. His programs, which examine trends in our so-called “pop culture”, pull no punches with either group. 
Sketch is a leading advertising artist who left that career to conduct his crusade for decency among teens. He’s the father of four children, three of whom are teens. As and artist he studied in Europe and Chicago and served as an art director for several leading publishers. He is also a musician who has directed both instrumental and choral groups.”

I’ve got tons of religious records. I’ve also got tons of spoken word religious records – so many, in fact, that I’ve had to break them into sections to separate the end-of-the-world prophecy LPs from the ‘what will happen when the godless commie liberals take over’ LPs from the ‘pastors talking to teens about sex, drugs and rock and roll’ LPs.
This one, from what I am guessing is the late 60s is one of the latter. I’ve got lots of these ones, too. There was something about the track listing on the back that drew me in. Sketch is more of the school of the ‘hep’ and ‘with it’ pastor who can ‘groove’ with today’s young generation. He doesn’t come across as openly judgemental about music, movies and pop trends but he is.

The main selling point for those of us with the constitution to listen to this hellfire and brimstone crap is the goofy skits and sketches (no pun intended) that serve to illustrate Erickson’s points about the slippery slope towards Satan. There are some hilarious attempts at approximating groovy hippy music done by a souless Christian folk group, complete with some awful guitar freakouts. It’s pretty funny.

 

Let’s have church

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Various Artists: Voices of the Angels (Spoken Words)

January 4, 2014

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The first in a series of three gargantuan Spoken-Word double-LP sets produced by Harvey Kubernik on his Freeway Records label.

Like the other two, this features bonafide Poets such as Wanda Coleman, Charles Bukowski, Dennis Cooper and others but also a smattering of the who’s who of the L.A. Punk scenesterati – Pleasant Gehman, Geza X, Chuck Dukowski (Black Flag, SWA) and some names and bands that might be familiar to more astute Angelino Punk watchers (The Marina Swingers, BPeople, among others).

There’s an extra-heavy emphasis on surfing, Valleys and other SoCal aspects of life, c. 1982. This one’s much more thematic about the whole L.A. lifestyle weltanschauung than the ensuing two albums to come (English As A Second Language and Neighborhood Rhythms – both of which I’ve posted before).  There’s also a lot less music than the other albums, with much more emphasis on poetry and prose.

Download (224.8 megs)

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